Justin Patten talks about those books of 2006 that he considers to be the best.  And yesterday, I listened to Charles Jones, a well-known speaker, say that asking someone to list the 10 books that made the most impact on their lives will tell you more about them than anything else can.

While I’ve heard others say something like this, I never sat down to make such a list. Yesterday, I did.

Here is my quickly drafted list. I’m sure I’ve left out other books that were very impactful. But, so be it.

In no particular order, except as I recalled them:
1.       Freedom Road by Howard Fast
2.       Advise and Consent by Allen Drury
3.       Franklin Autobiography by Benjamin Franklin
4.       Ben Franklin: America’s Original Entrepreneur by Blaine McCormick
5.       The Language of the Law by David Mellinkoff
6.       Fear of Flying by Erica Jong
7.       It’s Not About the Bike by Lance Armstrong
8.       1776 by David McCullough
9.       Tuesdays With Morrie by Mitch Albom
10.     The Client by John Grisham

So, there you have it. If you’re a psychologist and come up with an interesting analysis of my life, please feel free to contact me.

Charlie Jones continued his remarks by saying that reading books should be the highest priority for anyone wanting to progress and reach the next level of success. At 79 years of age, he still is a voracious reader and now publisher of books. And he has reached the pinnacle of success in his chosen career. He attributes this to the many books he has read over the years.

Side note:  You might protest that lawyers (you) are very busy. Where will you find the time to also read important, but non-law practice related, books? Yet, many lawyers do. So, this is not an acceptable excuse!